NASSAU, Bahamas:
Stephen Gardiner sped to victory in the men's 400m in the opening leg of the 2017 Diamond League in Doha, Qatar on Friday. The Bahamian national record holder cruised to a time of 44.60 to record his second straight win for the 2017 season. Lining up against a quality field, Gardiner majestically strode down the back straight before powering around the final bend to come in the home stretch well ahead of his competitors. The 21 year old then eased over the line leaving America's two time World champion Lashawn Merritt (44.78) and 2013 World Championships silver medallist Tony McQuay (44.92) in second and third place. Gardiner opening his season with a grand style improving his own Bahamian record to 44.26 at the Grenada Invitational on April 8.

Speaking after his triumph, the 2016 Rio Olympics 4x400m bronze medallist said his run was a hard one but he was confident of the victory. The Murphy Town, Abaco native has taken on the mantle of the leading quarter miler from The Bahamas Chris "Fireman' Brown.

Former world high jump champion Donald Thomas was third in the men's high jump with a 2.29m clearance. Thomas edged Majid Aidin Ghazal of Syria for third place as both jumpers cleared the same distance. Qatar's Mutaz Barshim cleared 2.36 for gold in front of his home fans. Robbie Grabarz of Great Britain took second spot (2.31).

by Brent Stubbs

WILLEMSTAD, Curacao: Team Bahamas completed day on of the 46th Flow Carifta Games with six medals - two golds, three silvers and a bronze - on Saturday at the Sentro Deportivo Korsou National Stadium.

Denvaughn Whymns kicked it off with a gold medal performance as the CC Sweeting standout cleared 7.31 metres or 23 feet, 113/4 inches.

He was followed by a gold and bronze medal from Megan Moss and Doneisha Anderson in the under-18 girls' 400m. Both ran personal best times of 53.68 and 54.32 seconds for their positions.

Laquell Harris got on the medal stand with her silver medal in the under-18 girls' shot put with her toss of 50.42 metres on her fifth try. Tiffany Hanna was seventh with her best of 40.74m.

Daehja Moss got the second silver for Team Bahamas on the field in the under-20 girls’ high jump with 1.73m. Adrian Curry added the other silver on the track in the under-18 boys’ 100m in 10.64.

The Bahamas had some misfortunes as well as as Devine Parker stumbled out of the blocks and did not finish the under-18 girls’ 100m final.

And Grand Bahamian Javan Martin false start after the under-20 boys' 100m final was recalled about 20m into the race.

Day one left the Bahamas sitting in third place in both the gold rush and the medal count behind defending champions Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago.

Written by Brent Stubbs for Bahamas Athletics 

THE Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations has a new constitution, replacing the old one that governed the sport since its formation 65 years ago.

A ratification meeting was held on Thursday for the new constitution that will go into effect on April 1, although it is still waiting to be approved by the International Amateur Athletic Federation.

The membership agreed 32-13 to accept the new constitution and while there was another vote for those against it, the membership voted 33-12 to unanimously pass it.

BAAA's president Rosamunde Carey and first vice president Tonique Williams called it a historic day for the association during a press conference on Sunday.

“The large percentage of votes cast in favor of the new constitution expressed the members desire for reform and confidence that the new articles met the evolving demands on the organizations and forms a reliable and principled framework to set the BAAA on a path of sustainable success,” Carey said.

Carey said the membership expressed confidence in the vision and work of the executive board as they continue to “raise the bar." 

The new constitution will fill the requirements as mandated by both the Government of the Bahamas and the International Amateur Athletic Federation (IAAF), the governing body for the sport around the world.

 “It was constrained by a culture of politics, a lack of resources and a structure that stagnated the growth and development of athletics,” Carey said.

Carey said the new document meets the requirements of the office of the Attorney General and can be registered as a non-profit company so as to comply with government policies.

“Further, it satisfies the requirements of the IAAF and other international organizations,” Carey said. “It proves a number of significant changes to the Bahamian athletics system and the executive board that will enable the BAAA to expand its reach and resources and enhance its performance at all levels.”

The following as some of the key changes to the new constitution:

• Appoint a paid Chief Executive Officer, who would be charged with the day-to-day operations of the federation with a focus on efficiencies.

• Restructure executive board with specific portfolios towards sharing the demanding responsibility of managing the federation activities.

• Length of the executive board tenure will move from three years to four years starting from the 2018 general elections.

• Introduce regional associations towards decentralizing athletics by enabling focused development in more Family Islands.

• Fix limit on the length of time an executive or council member can serve – no more than two consecutive terms, or the equivalent of eight years.

Under their platform 'United Purpose’ that they used to be elected in 2015, Williams said their executive team began the process of reforming the constitution and they can proudly boost of the completion of the document.

“This document was not about ourselves, it was not about self goals, but this was a document that was we thought represented where we thought the federation should be headed,” Williams stressed.

Williams also said that the new document will now remove the voting powers from the executives back to the people who matter - their athletes, coaches and affiliates.

And she said it will also empower all of their associations to do more work as the BAAA takes a step back once the New Providence Amateur Athletic Association is formed.

The nine-member constitution committee comprised of Carl Oliver, Patrick Adderley, Maybeline Miller, coach Rudolph Ferguson, Harrison Petty, president of the Parents Association; Pauline Davis, IAAF Council Member; Attorney Winifred Adderley; Kelly Albury, a coach from Grand Bahama and Curtis Pride, the former president of the Coaches Association.

Former BAAA’s president Desmond Bannister also assisting the committee in completing the document.

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC) today announced their title sponsorship of the IAAF World Relays Bahamas 2017 slated for April 22 and 23, 2017 at the Thomas A. Robinson National Stadium. The sponsorship is valued at some $275,000.00

BTC joins sponsors for this event which pushes The Bahamas even higher in the world’s sporting arena. The sponsors and categories are as follows:
National Partner:
Caribbean Bottling Company Bahamas Limited

National Supplier:
Bahamas Waste
Bahamasair
Bahamas Power and Light
Commonwealth Brewery Limited (Kalik)
Restaurants Bahamas Limited  (KFC)
        
Public Institutions:
Ministry of Tourism
Ministry of Youth Sports and Culture
Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations

National Broadcaster:
The Broadcasting Corporation of The Bahamas

Local sponsors of the event will join IAAF Official Partners ASICS, SEIKO and TDK and Official Supplier Mondo.

Rosemunde Carey, CEO, IAAF/BTC World Relays stated that, “The success of any venture of this magnitude is the partnership of good corporate citizenry. We will take this opportunity with your partnership, to promote not only our athletes and country, but BTC as a valuable corporate citizen. Your enthusiastic support has added vibrancy to our unique branding of the IWR that no other country has ever hosted.”

BTC CEO Mr. Leon Williams said that, “This is another “blue letter day” in the history of BTC. Today, we are again stepping up to the plate, investing almost $400,000 in the youth of this nation to ensure that their limitless potential is met. By investing in the community, we are investing in a better future for the entire country.”  

As a part of its sponsorship, BTC will have naming rights for the upcoming relays and the event will be called the IAAF/BTC World Relays.

The Bahamas was selected as host based on the unique appeal of the country and its people in their role as hosts of a tourism-based nation and the fact that The Bahamas has a rich history in athletics, relays in particular.

Local sponsors can expect a quality event for several reasons:
The BTC/IAAF World Relays Bahamas 2017 is the most highly anticipated local event of 2017
Rio medallists including Chris Brown, Asafa Powell, and Andre De Grass have committed to attend.
Countries will bring their best teams to qualify for the London World Championships 4 x 100m and 4 x400m.
For the first time in the Relays the best women in the world will compete against the best men in the world in the 4 x400m mixed gender relay
The competition will be fierce as countries compete for the coveted golden baton.

ABOUT BTC:  BTC is the first quad play provider in The Bahamas. The company offers a full suite of landline, internet, mobile and television services allowing customers to stay connected throughout The Bahamas. BTC is deeply rooted in community and supports a wide range of culture, youth, education and sporting initiatives. These include Junkanoo, Bahamas Junkanoo Carnival, IAAF/BTC World Relays and CARIFTA. BTC maintains a four year scholarship program with The College of The Bahamas and provides funding for the College’s endowment fund.  Just recently, the company signed an agreement for the establishment of an Innovation Lab at the College. The company is jointly owned by Liberty Global and The Government of The Bahamas.

Sponsors will have access to a sundry of benefits as partners of the IAAF World Relays Bahamas 2017. For more information on becoming a sponsor, please contact Marcia Dorsett, Sales & Sponsorship Coordinator at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Written by Bret Stubbs for Bahamas Athletics

BAHAMAS 2016 Olympic relay coach Shaun Miller was elected as the new president of the Bahamas Association of Athletic Coaches during the elections of the annual general meeting on Saturday at the Thomas A. Robinson National Stadium. Miller, head coach of the Bahamas Speed Dynamics, was elected after he won over Patrick Adderley. The father of Olympic (2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) gold medalist Shaunae Miller replaced Curtis Pride who didn’t seek re-election. Also elected to serve with Miller over the next two years are Rudolph Ferguson as first vice president, winning over former sprinter Ravanno Ferguson from Grand Bahama, while Jason Larrimore, also from Grand Bahama, went in unopposed as second vice president. Additionally, Cedricka Rolle is the secretary general, winning the position over Lakeitha Charlton, who assumed the post of assistant secretary. Dawn Johnson was elected unopposed as treasurer. Six persons vie for four spots as board members. Elected were David Ferguson, Andrew Tynes, Rickey Moxey and Christian Knowles. They won over Peter Pratt and Clarita Hall. A total of 120 coaches were registered and 106 cast their votes. Miller, the relay coach for the Olympic team last year said after he was approached by various coaches to run, he gladly accepted the challenge. “They felt as if they needed someone to go out there and plead their case,” Miller said in an interview to Bahamas Athletics immediately following the elections. First and foremost on the agenda for Miller is to get the proper funding in case for the BAAC. “This organization has been around for some time now but we’ve always had a problem with funding. If you can fund the elite athletes, then I feel you can fund the elite coaches or the elite coaches programme because that is what each and every one of these coaches are in The Bahamas." “So I’m looking for funding from the government. That is one of my immediate plans.” Now that he’s in the chair as the president of the association, Miller said he’s going to try his best to ensure that all of the coaches are treated fairly. “I intend to be your servant for the next two years,” he stated. “I hope that can make a difference. When they elected me, they elected me to use me and I intent to make a difference.” Miller said he’s pleased with his team of officers, starting with Ferguson, whom he has credited for his longevity and Larrimore who will be responsible for Grand Bahama. Rolle, who started out coaching at the primary school level, has also been around the sport as a former athlete; Miller said she will have her workload ahead of her. “She seemed to love kids and is well educated, so her job is cut out for her,” Miller insisted. “Her assistant, Mrs Charlton, came from (BACO) Bahamas Association of Certified Officials so she bring a new twist. So I’m expecting a lot out of her.” As for the rest of the members, including those on the board, Miller said he’s just as excited about what they all bring to the table and he’s confident that with the team assembled, they will get the job done. Miller said even after the election was over, his opponent Patrick Adderley came over and congratulated him and consented to assist in whatever way he can.

BAHAMAS 2016 Olympic relay coach Shaun Miller was elected as the new president of the Bahamas Association of Athletic Coaches during the elections of the annual general meeting on Saturday at the Thomas A. Robinson National Stadium. Miller, head coach of the Bahamas Speed Dynamics, was elected after he won over Patrick Adderley. The father of Olympic (2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) gold medalist Shaunae Miller replaced Curtis Pride who didn’t seek re-election. Also elected to serve with Miller over the next two years are Rudolph Ferguson as first vice president, winning over former sprinter Ravanno Ferguson from Grand Bahama, while Jason Larrimore, also from Grand Bahama, went in unopposed as second vice president. Additionally, Cedricka Rolle is the secretary general, winning the position over Lakeitha Charlton, who assumed the post of assistant secretary. Dawn Johnson was elected unopposed as treasurer. Six persons vie for four spots as board members. Elected were David Ferguson, Andrew Tynes, Rickey Moxey and Christian Knowles. They won over Peter Pratt and Clarita Hall. A total of 120 coaches were registered and 106 cast their votes. Miller, the relay coach for the Olympic team last year said after he was approached by various coaches to run, he gladly accepted the challenge. “They felt as if they needed someone to go out there and plead their case,” Miller said in an interview to Bahamas Athletics immediately following the elections. First and foremost on the agenda for Miller is to get the proper funding in case for the BAAC. “This organization has been around for some time now but we’ve always had a problem with funding. If you can fund the elite athletes, then I feel you can fund the elite coaches or the elite coaches programme because that is what each and every one of these coaches are in The Bahamas." “So I’m looking for funding from the government. That is one of my immediate plans.” Now that he’s in the chair as the president of the association, Miller said he’s going to try his best to ensure that all of the coaches are treated fairly. “I intend to be your servant for the next two years,” he stated. “I hope that can make a difference. When they elected me, they elected me to use me and I intent to make a difference.” Miller said he’s pleased with his team of officers, starting with Ferguson, whom he has credited for his longevity and Larrimore who will be responsible for Grand Bahama. Rolle, who started out coaching at the primary school level, has also been around the sport as a former athlete; Miller said she will have her workload ahead of her. “She seemed to love kids and is well educated, so her job is cut out for her,” Miller insisted. “Her assistant, Mrs Charlton, came from (BACO) Bahamas Association of Certified Officials so she bring a new twist. So I’m expecting a lot out of her.” As for the rest of the members, including those on the board, Miller said he’s just as excited about what they all bring to the table and he’s confident that with the team assembled, they will get the job done. Miller said even after the election was over, his opponent Patrick Adderley came over and congratulated him and consented to assist in whatever way he can.

2012 Olympic 4x400m champion and 2010 world indoor gold medallist Chris Brown has been one of the world’s leading one-lap runners for more than 15 years. Here the Bahamian superstar they call 'The Fireman' shares with us one major obstacle he overcame in the early phase of his career.

A cancelled recruiting meeting

“My biggest challenge came when I was a schoolboy trying to establish myself in track and field.

“At the time, I was in 12th grade living on my home island of Eleuthera. I was a promising young athlete with dreams of attending a US university on an athletics scholarship. I was very excited to find out a scout from a US college was keen to meet us. A coach was then supposed to take a group of six athletes to see the scout, but the coach ended up taking only four athletes, leaving myself and another athlete at home without telling us. We turned up on time at the meeting point only to be told there had been a change of schedule and that they had left two hours earlier. 

“At that time, I was a total wreck. I was very sad, didn’t know where to turn. It was not a good feeling. Yet it was a blessing for me that driving back in the car with my mum and my mentor and coach at the time, Michael Coakley, they explained to me not to give up and that this was only the beginning. At the time, I was hearing it, but I didn’t understand it.

“My mum then made the sacrifice to send me back to school and I repeated my 12th grade again. From that point on I just wanted to make her proud every time I stepped on the track.

“In the end, it turned out to be the best decision I had made. I knew I had a lot of talent, I just needed the world to see who I was. I finished that year ranked number one in The Bahamas and this gave me the opportunity for many top US universities to see me compete.

“It worked out in my favour and I went on to compete for Southern University in New Orleans and later Norfolk State University in Virginia.

"For me, missing out on seeing that scout (for a US college) through no fault of my own made me a better person. It made me appreciate the little things in life and also taught me never to give up. It may have been a huge negative at the time, but I managed to turn it into a positive. That one bad experience changed my life forever.”

Steve Landells for the IAAF

By
Christopher Osborne
B.Athletics Reporter

       Coaches have their eyes affixed on a new promising flash of lightening and a different sound of thunder.  This powerful flash of lightning and sound of thunder is bottled-up in an eight year old athlete, who has seemingly captured the attention of several coaches reveling the stadium to capture and savor his performance.
This young and vibrant athlete, Jaden Clarke, ran the 100 meter event in a time of 14.95 seconds and captured the attention of parents, fans and definitely, track coaches at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field stadium at recent events.  This so-called “Superman!” performance will again be thunder rolled at upcoming events that no one, not even photo journalists, can afford to miss.     
Clarke is an excellent student at Summit Academy, which was founded on the principle that “learning systems have to be sufficiently flexible and adaptable to meet the individualized needs of its student population.”
And SA’s student (Jaden) has gained this principle.  In fact, the foundation of Summit Academy and Clarke’s parents’ principle and standard, are certainly interwoven into leading Jaden Clarke’s goals and brilliance in the right direction; whereas Jaden’s mother mentioned how pleased she is with her son, his progress and the direction in which he going.  Also, she is ecstatic how Jaden has been focusing on his running technique and strategies, jives, getting out the blocks, going the extra mile to practice, and interestingly watching how retired 100m and 200m Olympian, Usain Bolt gains the upper hand and advantage of his contenders in various events.  
Jaden has speed and agility and intellectually, he is cognoscente of where he is, where he needs to be and what he has to do to get there. In an interview with this journal after his event, Jaden, passionately said, “I feel good how well I run the 200m and the 100m events.”  This young athlete has run the 100 meter event much faster and, to date, his fastest time on record in the 100 meter event stands at 14.50 seconds.  Looking back at his race in the 100m, Jaden said, “I was a little nervous when the gun went off.  I stepped up and after my jive phase, I got tall and stride into the finish line.”
During training practices Jaden does his “…warm-ups, stretches and drills as well as, makes sure that I am eating properly,” he said.  “To start the day off, I have a good breakfast, sometimes grits with tuna and, I drink a lot of water to keep my body hydrated.  Also, I practice properly to make sure I don’t have any injuries,” said the soon becoming nine year old, as he sat with his older sister and manager, Aaliyah Clarke, in the bleaches with his track team, Club Monica Athletics, which is led by head coach, Dianne Woodside.    
Further, despite facing some minor injuries, Jaden noted that in order to improve, “after injuries, I would ice my legs and work on quick recovery. To improve I would have to move my legs faster.”  
At this early age, Jaden is also very serious and focused. “Even though other young athletes are not there to practice,” noted his mother, Mrs. Yvette Clarke, “he still shows up for practice.”
Jaden’s manager, none other than his older sister, Aaliyah Clarke, said that “for someone his age, so young, he is really headstrong.  He does not accept No! for an answer.  He always wants to improve.  It is beautiful to see that he is willing to work hard and dedicate his time into practice and, still be able to have fun and enjoy it (his performance).”  Aaliyah is highly concern and serious to remain Jaden’s manager into the future, focusing her career on becoming an attorney.
Academically, Jaden is an outstanding student at Summit Academy, The Bahamas’ “Smaller, Smarter School” which is a private school that offers a program of academic excellence to students in preschool through middle school.  
However, looking into the near future as a professional athlete, Jaden said, “I see this as a career for me (in the 100m & 200m) event. My aim is to be a professional athlete and, so, now I have to focus on this career.” Yet, jokingly, Jaden mentioned that he wants to be an Olympian and maybe later on in life focus on playing professional football. Therefore, his goal and challenge to others is to “work hard, keep fit, stay focus and have fun with what you do.  The sky is the limit,” he said.

Bahamas Athletics

With one focus in mind, TaVont Mott, stepped up to the starting blocks and with a “bang” of the Mr. Starter’s gun, he was out of the blocks to set a new record in the 200 Meters of the Men’s Under 20 event.
This outstanding performance was staged on February 04, 2017, at the 14th annual Star Trackers,Star Performers Track and Field Classic, which was held at the acclaimed Thomas A. Robinson track and field stadium.
Running with such speed and agility, Motts not only set a new event record with a time of 21.07seconds, but, he noted that he was pleased with his performance, especially as a hurdler.  However, with a higher standard in mind, Mott’s goal is to run a faster time in this event.    
“I felt running this event was really to run the 200 meters in 20.00 seconds in order to make the World Relays” said Mott, who is aiming to make this happen in the next upcoming event at T.A.R., in order to run professionally.
The 18 year old, Mott, who graduates this year from St. Augustine’s College, has an academic goal in mind to attend university.  In fact, with a new career outlook and perspective upon completing his four years of attendance at the “Big Red Machine’s” track and field powerhouse.   SAC’s 2017 graduate stated that his career goal is to become a Pilot and upon completing his studies, “my aim is to return to The Bahamas and develop my country with the establishment of my own company,” reiterated Mott.
As a Star Tracker, Mott has spent five years with the athletic club, whereas, he received his focused training of hard work.  In fact, he noted that while “with the club, I was dying here and there.  However, they helped me a lot to build character and become the honest and respectful man that I am and to be honest, stay focus and push myself harder during practice.”
 As a hurdler, the 2016 Carifta standout received much assistance through Star Performers’ goal which is “to successfully aid in the confidence, development and guidance of young athletes (like Mott) by establishing quality relationships and fostering an environment of trust, collaboration and growth.”
Based on Star Trackers’ goal, Mott sincerely and without hesitation expressed many thanks to Star Trackers Athletic Club head coach David Charlton responsible for Sprints, Hurdles and Quarter Miles; Team Manager, Laura Pratt-Charlton as well as, to Mr. Rudolph Ferguson, National coach and Star Trackers’ Sprints coach.
With much gratitude to these coaches for their continued support in coaching him and pushing him to this level, Mott extended an additional, special appreciation and gratitude of assistance to Olympian, Carl Oliver, a bronze medalist in the relay at the 2000 Summer Olympics and a finalist at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics and the 1999 World Championships in Athletics. Oliver also helped set a national record of 3:02.85 minutes at the 1995 World Championships in Athletics.  
“He (Oliver) was my mentor, a role model who discovered me, came here and supported me” said Mott, quite calmly.  
In training, the 2016 Carifta record holder who ran a time of 13.1 in the Under 18 Boys 110 Hurdles said, “I am really a hurdler and actually, training is really rough and hard and it takes a lot of vomiting and pain, to get where I am now.”
“In order to perfect myself,” said Mott, “I had to work hard on running curves, run it hard, improve my momentum and take me home to the finish line.”   This aspiring professional athlete said his specific motto is to “have a positive outlook in life, never giving up, even when it seems hard; staying focus on your dreams and putting in the hard work.”
 Furthermore, Mott noted that “even when in pain, an athlete must keep pushing him or herself, never doubting yourself and always be positive, eat healthy and get sufficient rest.”
Head coach, David Charlton noted that Mott “is way ahead of himself and with one month before Carifta Trials, we anticipate that Mott will have a banner season.”  Focusing on Mott’s training, Charlton noted that Mott “is a good student who is coachable and very hungry towards running.  This is rare to find these qualities in an athlete.  Those are qualities of success” Charlton emphasized.
Also, Coach Rudolph Ferguson a sprint coach noted that sometimes he works with Mott for speed. “I watched Mott over the four to five year period and, he has developed into a fine young man who is focused with a goal in mind to accomplishing, goal after goal.  The sky is the limit for him.”
On behalf of the Star Trackers Star Performers Athletic Club, Charlton expressed sincere appreciation to their sponsors, volunteers, officials and most importantly to the parents in making this 14th Star Trackers, Star Performers Track and Field Classic a success. In fact, with a positive note, he said, we were also able to be timely “in getting out of here before dark.”
Star Trackers Club is geared towards the athletic development of young athletes that allows for the improvement of key skills such as discipline, time management and goal setting. As well as with a mentoring and coaching program that provides  an opportunity to expand these skills beyond the athletic forum into a more personal and social capacity.

By Christopher Osborne


It’s an Olympian affair of Holy Matrimony between Estonia Decathlon Olympian, Maicel Uibo and Shaunae Miller, Bahamian Olympic gold medalist in the 400 meters of the 2016 Olympics games, held in Rio, Brazil.   
Miller and Uibo’s social media referrals of marriage confirmation and accolades are an added hotspot of flames for Bahamians ‘and internationals, as the two Olympians tied the knot on February 04, 2017 here in Nassau, Bahamas.
Recently, Uibo participated in the 11th annual Road Runners Track and Field Shot Put event and, he is expected to compete in the upcoming World Championship games.
The Estonian decathlete who finished 19th at the 2013 World Championships in Moscow, Russia said that after completing his studies with college in the United States of America, “thought it best to have a change of country of practice and reside here for a few months.”   
After asking why he chose to train in Nassau, Bahamas, Uibo noted “I wanted a change of environment instead of being in the US at the University of Georgia, I decided to come train in Nassau’s weather and, my body feels better in warm weather” Uibo added.  
However, apart from training, the well focused decathlete, Uibo, spends his time with his lovely Bahamian fiancée, Shaunae Miller.  His overall goal during his training and practice here in Nassau, is to “stay healthy for the Decathlon.”  
Meanwhile, on the field, Uibo is receiving professional coaching from renowned Bahamian medalist, Shot Putter great, Bradley Cooper.  “Brad” noted that “Uibo is working on his technique (in the shot put) and is trying to raise his standards and measurements for the Decathlon.”   Cooper is also a retired male discus thrower and shot putter for the Bahamas, who noted further that “Uibo is very coachable,” as he looked on to ascertain further Uibo’s shot-put measurements and final throw of (14.30) to edge out other Bahamian competitors in the Road Runner’s track and field event.
Walking over to the high jump scene in the stadium, Uibo politely says “thanks Coach!” to “Brad” Cooper, who was also top athlete for his native country in two consecutive Summer Olympics, starting in 1984 and setting his personal best, 67.10 metres (220.1ft), in the discus event on June 14, 1986 in Nassau.
For the high jump event, Uibo soared to a season’s best of 21.05 on January 21, 2017 in the Road Runner’s 11th annual Dianna Lynn Thompson Event that was held Saturday, January 21st, 2017 at the Thomas A Robinson stadium.
This in itself, is a great moment for the 24 year old Estonian decathlete who is garnering as much as he can in what is, a once in a life time opportunity to work with Cooper and gain some additional coaching in  preparation for his upcoming international events.  Recently, the 2016 Olympian, Maicel Uibo picked up the 2016 Male Track and Field Athlete of the Year.  
Looking toward the near future and with an aim to remain in Nassau for a few months, Uibo noted that he is readying himself for the seasonal events that will resume in May, 2017.  Extending an early congratulation to Uibo on graduating from University this year, the Estonian decathlete says that after his sports career, he is uncertain what or where he will venture into, however, while taking a brief pause with a serious expression, he said, “I will remain hopeful.”

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Friday, 24 March 2017

BTC IS TITLE SPONSOR OF IAAF WORLD RELAYS BAHAMAS 2017

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC) today announced their title sponsorship of the IAAF World Relays Bahamas 2017 slated for April 22 and 23, 2017 at the Thomas A. Robinson National ...